Court allows class action plaintiffs to set up social media accounts to draw in other plaintiffs

Some former interns sued Gawker media under the Fair Labor Standards Act. The court ordered the parties to meet and confer about the content and dissemination of the proposed notice to other potential class members. Plaintiffs suggested, among other things, that they establish social media accounts (Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn) titled “Gawker Intern Lawsuit” or “Gawker Class Action”. Gawker objected.

The court permitted the establishment of the social media accounts. It rejected Gawker’s argument that the lack of evidence that any former intern used social media would make the notice ineffective. The court found it “unrealistic” that the former interns did not maintain social media accounts.

Gawker also argued that social media to give notice would take control of the dissemination out of the court’s hands. Since users could comment on the posted content, Gawker argued, the court would be “deprived” of its ability to oversee the message. The court likewise rejected this argument, holding that its “role [was] to ensure the fairness and accuracy of the parties’ communications with potential plaintiffs – not to be the arbiter of all discussions not involving the parties that may take place thereafter.”

Mark v. Gawker Media LLC, No. 13-4347, 2014 WL 5557489 (S.D.N.Y. November 3, 2014)